Acid bath murderer dissolves couple’s remains

Acid bath murderer dissolves couple’s remains

One of the most bizarre and disturbing cases of mass murder is that committed by John Haigh, a respectable, well dressed, middle-class man with a surfeit of charm who, in the late 1940s, disposed of at least six victims in vats of sulphuric acid.

Eventually becoming known to the public as the “Acid Bath Murder.” Haigh’s motivations for his crimes, which involved luring his prey to a fate where their blood was consumed before being dissolved in acid, have never been clearly corroborated. Many believe that instead of insanity fueling Haigh’s vampire-like activities, he was in fact a cold-hearted killer who arrogantly believed that where there was no body, there was no crime.

But despite finding any bodies there was still scientific evidence. Pretending to be interested in a house being sold by Doctor Archibald Henderson, Haigh befriended the doctor and his wife Rose. The couple eventually invited Haigh, a practicing pianist from a young age, over to play piano at one of their parties. What the couple were unaware of was Haigh had rented a workshop just streets away from the residence, where he stored two large tubs of sulphuric acid, in which he planned to dispose of their bodies.

On February 12th Haigh invited Dr. Henderson over to the workshop to show him an “invention” he was working on. When Henderson arrived Haigh immediately shot and killed the doctor. Soon after he phoned Rose, and told her husband went ill. Upon hearing the news Mrs. Henderson rushed over to the workshop, where Haigh also took her life.